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Monday, April 2, 2018

Recipe for Dealing with Trouble -Martin Terwel


Recipe for Dealing with Trouble 1. Trouble is an everyday part of life, phenomenon of existence. Many of us are brought up with the concept that everything should be rosy. That's why many people think they themselves have done something wrong when trouble happens to them. It is possible of course that this is true (such as when driving drunk, living unhealthily, etc.) but most often you just can't be blamed for this personally. It is a waste to hurt yourself in this way; trouble is often already bad enough by itself. 2. Trouble can also have positive effects. What I mean by that is the following: When trouble brings you down, the good times of the past can become more precious to you. Moreover, it is possible that, if things get better for you in the future, you will appreciate the experience of them more intensely. 3. You can learn from trouble, so that you will be able to meet them better armed in the future. Moreover you can strengthen in facing trouble, through which process you will get a tougher covering on your soul so that the next trouble will hit you less fiercely. 4. Trouble can be a kind of doorstep. It takes you force and energy to get over it, but by doing this you raise yourself a bit so that you may get more insight. 5.It could be that everything in your life will balance itself out. You measure your trouble against your windfalls and serendipities. The two of them together will make up how you feel. The worse your pain or sadness was, the more intense your pleasure or joy can be. Of course it can be the other way around too. By accepting them, you can give them a place. Also, that acceptance can help make sure that everything in your life will balance itself out according to your experience. 6. Another way to look at trouble is to see it as a short cut. You learn and strengthen fast on such occasions. You don't need to think of them as a loss of time. 7. The intensity in which trouble hits you is often related to your own expectations. In fact, this is quite a simple truth: someone who has no expectations (of life) at all and takes every possibility into account, will be able to accept everything. Seen from that perspective, the next observation might be of some worth too: How could you possibly be disappointed in your life if there is absolutely no way to know what you ought to expect? That's why the combination of humility and resignation is a good one in life. 8. It often happens trouble turns out to be an unexpected good in the long run. A good example would be if you get fired but then find a much more enjoyable job that is a lot better too. Of course this does not mean that if you are in the middle of some kind of trouble, you will always see the next steps coming. However, the knowledge that trouble can turn into an unexpected good can elevate the experience of going over it. 9. Through several experiences in my life (n.b., this is a personal belief) I have gotten a very strong idea that life has a purpose for everyone, although we don't know it ourselves. Reasoned from this view, you can never really find out whether you're doing fine or doing poorly. It could be part of this purpose to be confronted with certain problems. That, of course, does not render them enjoyable. But maybe, knowing this, it can get easier to cope with them. From this perspective it is also interesting to know that it's not about what you want to do with your life, but what life wants with you. The person who is in agreement with this shall see that it is impossible for someone else to find out whether you're doing fine or doing poorly and if you're doing well or poorly with respect to your purpose. Let this knowledge protect you against other people's judgments and blamings. 10. I see trouble as something that could be useful in this life – not simply for an individual personally, but possibly also for all of humanity. It would not surprise me if it turns out that we all make contributions to the development and growth of humanity. From that perspective your fight with trouble might serve the whole of humanity. This outlook can make the experience of trouble a lighter one. 11. Trouble can benefit you by helping you get to know yourself better. Hence, you will make better decisions in the future, because those are based on the (lived-through) knowledge of yourself that you have lived (through). This is better than simply evaluating yourself based on someone else's judgments, expectations and knowledge. 12. Besides a better knowledge of yourself, trouble can give you a better understanding of the people around you. Often you will learn who is truly your friend in bad circumstances. Moreover, you can then discover who is only interested in you if you are doing fine. It is often a sobering experience, but everything taken together, you can come out of it as a richer person. 13. We humans can't understand life. It obeys laws of a higher logic, something higher beyond us. Since we don't know these laws, we can't really find out whether something is good or not. It is therefore entirely possible that certain developments can only be set into motion through trouble. This outlook, too, can change your perception of trouble. 14.Many people who are confronted with trouble feel like that they are losing their way. However, since no one truly knows their way, this is completely impossible, and it is an illusion that you could get lost in life. I see this as a rich thought. 15. Trouble can also presage self-critique and self-conciousness. If you are suffering, you will probably try your utmost to get out of this situation. The more and longer you suffer, the bigger will be the change – and, if you keep responding to tegenslagen in a positive way, - you will develop yourself. As the Dutch saying goes: “The more shit there is, the more beautiful the roses will be that grow on them.” 16. No matter how bad the circumstances you encounter will be, there is always something to look forward to. This could even be death, in the worst case scenario. 17. Suppose you had to pay a lot of money to live on this earth. Wouldn't you try to get the most out of it? Think of a theme park: you pay your entrance fee, and when you're inside, you won't sit down on a bench, thinking of all your sorrows, but you will try to get as much value for your money. By viewing existence like this, you get a richer life. 18. Trouble can keep you humble: an elevated position in life. 19. Every trouble you experience as a problem has to do with a lack of acceptance: a person who can accept everything can't even know what problems are. 20. If you're doing well, that is good for you. If you're not doing well, that state is good for your development. I personally don't really see any difference between you and your development. 21. If you are temporarily disabled by trouble, the time you spent living with it does not have to be lost time, because you will develop some kind of hunger, through which your life will ' taste' richer afterwards. 22. People who encounter trouble often look for their cause, but the causes can always be found. For example: “If so-and-so had not done such-and-such, then this result would not have happened to me.” But you do not always look back far enough. If your parents had not been there, then you wouldn't have been there either, and of course it would not have happened. If you apply this search for reasons consistently, you go even further back: to your grandparents, or even the Creation or Big Bang. Is it necessary to hold God or Nature accountable for what happens to you? 23. Try to make sure that you don't need anything in life or the world to feel good yourself. Seek peace and confirmation in yourself itself and try to avoid making yourself dependent on factors you simply can't influence. 24. Don't get angry at or disappointed by a wrong decision. Wrong decisions simply do not exist. At the very moment you made your decision it was good. The only thing that could happen is that a decision turns out badly, but that does not render your decision wrong, especially since you couldn't have done any better in that very moment, because otherwise you would have done so. 25. You usually learn to spend your money wisely when you lack it. The same goes for life. Someone who has encountered trouble can have a better grip on life, so that the burden of future trouble can be smaller. 26. Everything in life is a matter of time. As time does not truly exist, I do not understand why people make such a fuss about it. 27. Life is made up, materially, in a perfect way. Indubitably this is also the case for the immaterial part of it. The tipping point is in our capabilities of understanding and insight, so try to trust life. 28. Nothing ever goes wrong in nature. As humans we have chosen to denote certain developments as wrong. You could regard this practice as wrong. 29. If something seems to go wrong in one way, it only goes right in another. The trick is to find the other angle. My way of doing this is: By assuming that we are here to learn and strengthen, I can give every trouble a place without losing my peace of mind. “When things seem to fall apart, they only fall together in another way”. 30. I have learned from my experiences (as spiritual counselor and as a human) that there is a certain degree of providence in this life. However, we don't know what the – so-called – plan is. Therefore it is hubristic to be disappointed with this life, because how can you be disappointed if you don't know what the end purpose is? 31. Do not base your conceptions of your happiness or misfortune on comparisons: you compare with your head, but feel with your heart. Moreover, it is the case that a comparison only tells you something about the differences between things, and is not really obliged to tell you anything about the person or situation itself. You can, for example, say that one apartment building is higher than another, but that does not say anything about how high they actually are. 32. Life on earth has all kinds of sides, both upsides and downsides. For whoever does not really want to experience all these different facets of life, the only real option is suicide (n.b. I am not advising anyone to do this). For everyone else, there is no reason to complain every time something unpleasant happens, because that is simply a risk of being human. 33. Life is not all about your experiences. Most of these are simply things that befall you. It is often more about how you respond to these experiences. Even these responses are also things that befall you in some way, being determined by your genes, character, and upbringing. Hence, you are not fully responsible for what befalls you. How you respond to that and the knowledge of that is very interesting. It could be liberating. My name is Martin Terwel and I live in the Netherlands. I am 60 years old and have been suffering from depression for the past 25 years and used to get regular bouts of psychoses too. It was hard for many, many years without a glimpse of improvement. Things started to change when gradually I developed insights that helped me deal with my condition. It was as if every new insight was a step in the right direction: upwards. I've collated my insights in a kind of recipe which helped to deal with trouble. The recipe has been published in several magazines and online too. It appears that being ill is not necessary to be able to benefit from these insights.

Tuesday, March 27, 2018

3 ways to Quieten your Mind- Cope with Anxiety and Worry-Kevin & Matt - MindBodyTraining.com


Are you aware of a dominant feeling that runs like an undercurrent through your life? Or maybe it's more of a subtle background state that seems to color everything that you say, do, and feel? Maybe it's a persistent feeling that you have when you wake up in the morning? ... (For example, you might feel a constant pressure to be busy and get things done. You might feel anxious about what the day might bring. You might feel confused or depressed about your prospects and possibilities.) What if you could feel peaceful, positive, and clear? Let me show you three simple ways you can bring that soothing power into your life. How you feel in your life has a lot to do with what's going on in your head. If you constantly hear thoughts telling you that "Life is a struggle," "The economy is bad," and "You aren't enough," these have a powerful impact on how you feel. These thoughts are like a proverbial "dark cloud hanging over you." One of the defining moments of awakening is when you discover that you "are not" the thoughts you are "having." You witness the incessant chatter that drives you, distracts you, and seems like your constant companion and you realize that you don't have to be defined by that. At that moment, you realize that those words in your head really have little to do with you. They also don't reflect what is actually happening in the world. You come to recognize that a majority of those words are just recorded messages from the past, the limiting thoughts of others, and random sounds from your environment. Nevertheless, they are broadcasting through your head. At that moment, you may get a strong urge to turn off that chatter, or at least turn down the volume, so it is less distracting. The truth is--you can learn to do just that. And it doesn't have to take years of practice, just a little guiding of your attention. Here are a few simple ways to turn down the mental volume and quiet your mind. I encourage you to try them out as you read them. Instead of just reading the words, pause at each one, and actually give it a try. You may be surprised at how effective they are. The great thing is, they take just a few moments. 3 Ways to Quiet Your Mind 1. See if you can listen to the chatter as an outside observer. See if you can separate "who you are" from those words in your head. Listen to them with an attitude of amused curiosity. Smiling while you do this can help. Allow the words to come and go through your mind without hanging onto any of them. Just watch them come and go. You could say, "Hey, they're just thoughts; they don't define me or what I can do." As you give your thoughts less importance, they lose their grip on your attention. Take a minute to observe your mental chatter with a smile. Here's a guided meditation audio that can help you 2. Focus on something else. If you become completely immersed in paying attention to something besides your thoughts, you'll notice that your mind quiets down. For example, place your hands on your abdomen and become aware of your breathing. See if it's possible to notice the moment when your inhale begins; follow your in-breath all the way through to a natural pause; notice the moment your exhale begins; follow that all the way through to a natural pause--and repeat. Become absolutely interested in following your breathing as if nothing else matters at this moment. Within a few breathing cycles, your mind quiets. Try it for yourself. 3. Ask yourself the question: "Who is thinking?" Then sit and be content that you really have no answer for that. Don't try to make up an answer.... Just notice how your mind becomes quiet in the face of that question. Try it for yourself and see what happens. Those are three great ways to get a taste of a quieter mind-- a mind that isn't consumed by incessant thinking, and, therefore, comes to rest in a natural peace

Tuesday, March 13, 2018

#HIVMythsAndFacts #WebMD


#HIVMythsAndFacts https://www.webmd.com/hiv-aids/ss/slideshow-hiv-myths-facts #aasraSuicidePrevention24x7Helpline912227546669 #BefriendersWorldwide #SamaritansUK #IASP #UN #WHO #AFSP #INFOTES #LifelineInternational #Google #Facebook #WorldMentalHealthAndWellnessAwarenessWeek #WorldMentalHealthAndWellnessAwarenessMonth #aasradotinfo. Having HIV Means You Have AIDS Myth. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a virus that destroys the body's CD4 immune cells, which help fight disease. With the right medications, you can have HIV for years or decades without HIV progressing to AIDS. AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome) is diagnosed when you have HIV as well as certain opportunistic infections or your CD4 cell count drops below 200. It's Difficult to Get HIV From Casual Contact Fact. You can't catch or spread HIV from hugging someone, using the same towel, or sharing the same glass. It's very rare to get HIV from a blood transfusion -- the U.S. blood supply is carefully tested. However, you can get the disease from having unprotected sex, sharing needles, or getting a tattoo from unsterilized equipment. Having HIV Means You Have AIDS Myth. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a virus that destroys the body's CD4 immune cells, which help fight disease. With the right medications, you can have HIV for years or decades without HIV progressing to AIDS. AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome) is diagnosed when you have HIV as well as certain opportunistic infections or your CD4 cell count drops below 200. Young couple in cafe sharing drink through straws 3/11 It's Difficult to Get HIV From Casual Contact Fact. You can't catch or spread HIV from hugging someone, using the same towel, or sharing the same glass. It's very rare to get HIV from a blood transfusion -- the U.S. blood supply is carefully tested. However, you can get the disease from having unprotected sex, sharing needles, or getting a tattoo from unsterilized equipment. Profile of a male doctor talking to a young woman 3/11 You Have Just a Few Years to Live Myth. Because of the HIV drugs that are now available, the truth is that many people can live for decades with HIV and have a normal or near-normal life span. You can help prevent HIV from progressing to AIDS by seeing your doctor regularly, taking your medicines, and following your doctor's guidance. Having HIV Means You Have AIDS Myth. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a virus that destroys the body's CD4 immune cells, which help fight disease. With the right medications, you can have HIV for years or decades without HIV progressing to AIDS. AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome) is diagnosed when you have HIV as well as certain opportunistic infections or your CD4 cell count drops below 200. Young couple in cafe sharing drink through straws 4/11 It's Difficult to Get HIV From Casual Contact Fact. You can't catch or spread HIV from hugging someone, using the same towel, or sharing the same glass. It's very rare to get HIV from a blood transfusion -- the U.S. blood supply is carefully tested. However, you can get the disease from having unprotected sex, sharing needles, or getting a tattoo from unsterilized equipment. Profile of a male doctor talking to a young woman 4/11 You Have Just a Few Years to Live Myth. Because of the HIV drugs that are now available, the truth is that many people can live for decades with HIV and have a normal or near-normal life span. You can help prevent HIV from progressing to AIDS by seeing your doctor regularly, taking your medicines, and following your doctor's guidance. African American man checking temperature 4/11 You'll Know You Have HIV Because of Your Symptoms Myth. Some people don't show signs of HIV for years after being infected. However, many can have some symptoms within 10 days to a few weeks after infection. These first symptoms are similar to the flu or mononucleosis and may include fever, swollen lymph nodes, sore throat, rash, and muscle aches. They usually disappear after a few weeks and you may not have symptoms again for several years. The only way to tell you have HIV is to get tested. HIV Can Be Cured Myth. There is no cure for HIV in most cases, but treatment can control virus levels and help maintain your immune system. Some drugs interfere with proteins HIV needs to copy itself; others block the virus from entering or inserting its genetic material into your immune cells. All HIV-infected people should start treatment. These medicines are called antiretroviral therapy. Your doctor can say what drug combination is best for you. Anyone Can Get HIV Fact. About 37,600 people in the U.S. get HIV each year, and more than 12,000 people with AIDS die each year. Anyone can get HIV -- men, women, and children, people who are gay or straight. Men who have sex with men make up about 26,300 new HIV infections each year. Women account for about 7,400 new infections. African-Americans continue to have the most severe burden of HIV, compared with other races and ethnicities. Sex Is Safe When Both Partners Have HIV Myth. Just because you and your partner both have HIV, it doesn't mean you should forget about protection when having sex. Using a condom or other latex barrier can help protect you from other sexually transmitted diseases as well as other strains of HIV, which may be resistant to anti-HIV medication. Even if you are being treated and feel well, you can still infect others. A young mother holds baby 7/11 You Can Have a Baby if You Are HIV-Positive Fact. Infected mothers can pass HIV to their babies during pregnancy or delivery. But you can lower the risk by working with your doctor and getting the right care and medication. Pregnant women with HIV can take medications to treat their infection and to help protect their babies against the virus. Mother watching her children in the water 7/11 You Can’t Avoid Other HIV-Related Infections Myth. People with HIV can be likely to get infections like pneumonia, tuberculosis, candidiasis, cytomegalovirus, and toxoplasmosis. The best way to cut the risk is to take HIV medications. People with advanced HIV infection (AIDS) can prevent some of these infections with specific drugs in addition to antiretroviral therapy. You can lessen exposure to some germs by avoiding undercooked meat, litter boxes, and contaminated water. Credit card in hand with prescription bottles 7/11 You Can't Get Lifesaving Drugs Without Insurance Myth. There are government programs, nonprofit groups, and some pharmaceutical companies that may help cover the cost of HIV/AIDS drugs. But be aware: These drug "cocktails" can cost $10,000 a year or more. Talk to your local HIV/AIDS service organization to learn about financial help. You Can Have a Baby if You Are HIV-Positive Fact. Infected mothers can pass HIV to their babies during pregnancy or delivery. But you can lower the risk by working with your doctor and getting the right care and medication. Pregnant women with HIV can take medications to treat their infection and to help protect their babies against the virus. You Can’t Avoid Other HIV-Related Infections Myth. People with HIV can be likely to get infections like pneumonia, tuberculosis, candidiasis, cytomegalovirus, and toxoplasmosis. The best way to cut the risk is to take HIV medications. People with advanced HIV infection (AIDS) can prevent some of these infections with specific drugs in addition to antiretroviral therapy. You can lessen exposure to some germs by avoiding undercooked meat, litter boxes, and contaminated water. Credit card in hand with prescription bottles 9/11 You Can't Get Lifesaving Drugs Without Insurance Myth. There are government programs, nonprofit groups, and some pharmaceutical companies that may help cover the cost of HIV/AIDS drugs. But be aware: These drug "cocktails" can cost $10,000 a year or more. Talk to your local HIV/AIDS service organization to learn about financial help. You Can't Get Lifesaving Drugs Without Insurance Myth. There are government programs, nonprofit groups, and some pharmaceutical companies that may help cover the cost of HIV/AIDS drugs. But be aware: These drug "cocktails" can cost $10,000 a year or more. Talk to your local HIV/AIDS service organization to learn about financial help. What Affects Your HIV Treatment? Things That Affect Your HIV Treatment Keep Treatment Under Control HIV drugs can keep you healthy and help you live a long life. They can also prevent the virus from spreading to people you have sex with. But be careful -- some things make it harder for the treatment to work. Know the best way to take your medicines so you will get the most out of them. Skipping Doses HIV drugs work by slowing down how fast the virus can make copies of itself in your body. When you skip a dose of your meds, that gives

How to Manage Conflict When You Have ADHD- webMD


Managing Conflict When You Have ADHD #aasraSuicidePrevention24x7Helpline912227546669 #BefriendersWorldwide #SamaritansUK #IASP #UN #WHO #AFSP #INFOTES #LifelineInternational #Google #Facebook #WorldMentalHealthAndWellnessAwarenessWeek #WorldMentalHealthAndWellnessAwarenessMonth #aasradotinfo. IN THIS ARTICLE Keep Up With Your Treatment Think Ahead Focus on Communication Know That People Want to Help Plan It Out Call a Time Out If you have attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), you may feel like the deck's stacked against you when it comes to conflict. That's because ADHD can: Make it hard to pay focus or pay attention. You might zone out during conversations or arguments, and the person you're speaking with might feel like you're ignoring them. They may even feel like you don't really care about them. Cause you to be unmotivated or make it hard for you to finish tasks. Other people may misinterpret this as laziness or a sign that you don't care. ADHD can also: Make you more irritable or prone to arguing Raise the chances that you're late, don't follow through on things, or forget important events, like birthdays Make emotional outbursts more likely Lead to impulsive behavior, like drinking too much or overspending All these things can bring on disagreements. But having ADHD doesn't mean you can't have good, healthy relationships with people close to you. CONTINUE READING BELOW YOU MIGHT LIKE WEBMD Pain Relief Head to toe, here's what helps. You can manage conflict and ease stress. Follow these steps: Keep Up With Your Treatment It eases symptoms. That can help you avoid confrontations and make it easier to deal with problems as they come up. Most of the time, ADHD is treated with cognitive behavioral therapy. That's a form of talk therapy that helps you identify or change negative thoughts. Medicine can also help. Many folks find a combination of both works best. If you often have trouble dealing with others, think about seeing a therapist or ADHD coach. They can do role-playing exercises with you to teach you new ways to communicate. They can also teach you skills to help you work through difficult conversations and situations. Think Ahead When you're about to have a tough talk or feel like an argument may crop up, think about what you want to accomplish before you speak. You can even try to visualize how you'd like to act before you see the other person. This can help you keep your cool in a heated situation. Focus on Communication Simple steps can make any conversation easier. Make sure you: Are face-to-face with the other person when you're talking to them Listen carefully when they're speaking Don't interrupt Ask questions when you don't understand something Let the other person know you understand them by using phrases like “It sounds like you're saying,” or “Tell me if I'm hearing you right ...” Managing Conflict When You Have ADHD IN THIS ARTICLE Keep Up With Your Treatment Think Ahead Focus on Communication Know That People Want to Help Plan It Out Call a Time Out CONTINUED Know That People Want to Help You might feel like the people closest to you are constantly criticizing or nagging you. Odds are, they just want to help and see you do your best. Try to keep in mind where they're coming from. Plan It Out If it's tough for you to follow through, and it's a regular source of conflict, work with your loved ones to come up with a “get it done” plan. Call a Time Out If you feel like you're losing your cool or a conversation isn't going the right way, take a break. It's OK to ask for a breather if you feel unfocused. You can resume your discussion later when you feel calm and ready to talk things through. WebMD Medical Reference Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari, MD on August 17, 2017 Sources © 2017 WebMD, LLC. All rights reserved.

Genes also play a role in empathy..Cambridge study finds


A new study published today suggests that how empathic we are is not just a result of our upbringing and experience but also partly a result of our genes. #aasraSuicidePrevention24x7Helpline912227546669 #BefriendersWorldwide #SamaritansUK #IASP #UN #WHO #AFSP #INFOTES #LifelineInternational #Google #Facebook #WorldMentalHealthAndWellnessAwarenessWeek #WorldMentalHealthAndWellnessAwarenessMonth #aasradotinfo. This is an important step towards understanding the small but important role that genetics plays in empathy Varun Warrier Empathy has two parts: the ability to recognize another person’s thoughts and feelings, and the ability to respond with an appropriate emotion to someone else’s thoughts and feelings. The first part is called ‘cognitive empathy’ and the second part ‘affective empathy’. Fifteen years ago, a team of scientists at the University of Cambridge developed the Empathy Quotient (EQ), a brief self-report measure of empathy. The EQ measures both parts of empathy. Previous research showed that some of us are more empathetic than others, and that on average, women are slightly more empathetic than men. It also showed that, on average, autistic people score lower on the EQ, and that this was because they struggle with cognitive empathy, even though their affective empathy may be intact. In a new study published in the journal Translational Psychiatry, the Cambridge team, working with the genetics company 23andMe and a team of international scientists, report the results of the largest genetic study of empathy using information from more than 46,000 23andMe customers. The customers all completed the EQ online and provided a saliva sample for genetic analysis. The study was led by Varun Warrier, a Cambridge PhD student, and Professors Simon Baron-Cohen, Director of the Autism Research Centre at Cambridge University, Thomas Bourgeron, of the University Paris Diderot and the Institut Pasteur, and David Hinds, Principal Scientist at 23andMe. The new study has three important results. First, it found that how empathetic we are is partly due to genetics. Indeed, a tenth of this variation is due to genetic factors. This confirms previous research examining empathy in identical versus non-identical twins. Second, the new study confirmed that women are on average more empathetic than men. However, this difference is not due to our DNA as there were no differences in the genes that contribute to empathy in men and women. This implies that the sex difference in empathy is the result of other non-genetic biological factors, such as prenatal hormone influences, or non-biological factors such as socialisation, both of which also differ between the sexes. Finally, the new study found that genetic variants associated with lower empathy are also associated with higher risk for autism. Varun Warrier said: “This is an important step towards understanding the small but important role that genetics plays in empathy. But keep in mind that only a tenth of individual differences in empathy in the population are due to genetics. It will be equally important to understand the non-genetic factors that explain the other 90%.” Professor Thomas Bourgeron added: “This new study demonstrates a role for genes in empathy, but we have not yet identified the specific genes that are involved. Our next step is to gather larger samples to replicate these findings, and to pin-point the precise biological pathways associated with individual differences in empathy.” Dr David Hinds said: “These are the latest findings from a series of studies that 23andMe have collaborated on with researchers at Cambridge. Together these are providing exciting new insights into the genetics influences underlying human behaviour.” Professor Simon Baron-Cohen added: “Finding that even a fraction of why we differ in empathy is due to genetic factors helps us understand people such as those with autism who struggle to imagine another person’s thoughts and feelings. This can give rise to disability no less challenging than other kinds of disability, such as dyslexia or visual impairment. We as a society need to support those with disabilities, with novel teaching methods, work-arounds, or reasonable adjustments, to promote inclusion.” This study also benefitted from support from the Medical Research Council, the Wellcome Trust, the Institut Pasteur, the CNRS, the University Paris Diderot, the Bettencourt-Schueller Foundation, the Cambridge Commonwealth Trust, and St John’s College, Cambridge. Reference Genome-wide analyses of self-reported empathy: correlations with autism, schizophrenia, and anorexia nervosa, by V Warrier, R Toro, B Chakrabarti, iPSYCH-Broad Autism Group, Grove J, Borglum AD, D Hinds, T Bourgeron, and S Baron-Cohen. Translational Psychiatry. DOI: 10.1038/s41398-017-0082-6 Researcher profile: Varun Warrier Varun Warrier is a PhD student at the Autism Research Centre, where he studies the genetics of autism and related traits. He moved to Cambridge in 2013 from India because of the Centre’s world-leading reputation. There are several key challenges in the field, he says. “First, we have identified only a fraction of the genes associated with autism. Second, no two autistic people are alike. Third, within the spectrum autistic people have different strengths and difficulties. Finally, those with a clinical diagnosis blend seamlessly into those in the population who don’t have a diagnosis but simply have a lot of autistic traits. We all have some autistic traits – this spectrum runs right through the population on a bell curve.” Although much of his work is computational, developing statistical tools to interrogate complex datasets that will enable him to answer biological questions, he also gets to meet many people with autism. “When I meet autistic people, I truly understand what's often said – no two autistic people are alike.” Warrier hopes his research will lead to a better understanding of the biology of autism, and that this will enable quicker and more accurate diagnosis. “But that's only one part of the challenge,” he says. “Understanding the biology has its limits, and I hope that, in parallel, there will be better social policies to support autistic people.” Cambridge is an exciting place to be a researcher, he says. “In Cambridge, there's always a local expert, so if you have a particular problem there usually is someone who can help you out. People here are not just thinking about what can be done to address the problems of today; they are anticipating problems that we will face in 20 years’ time, and are working to solve those.”

Sunday, March 11, 2018

First Aid Test: Could You Save a Life?


Sometimes, the best way to learn is to test ourselves. It's surprising how little some of us know about CPR, even though this knowledge could save someone's life one day, probably someone we care about. So, here's a little test to see how much you know about giving first aid in case of an emergency. http://www.ba-bamail.com/content.aspx?emailid=24168

Saturday, March 10, 2018

Break the silence for Suicide Attempt Survivors


Break the silence for Suicide Attempt Survivors- JD Schramm #aasraSuicidePrevention24x7Helpline912227546669 #BefriendersWorldwide #SamaritansUK #IASP #UN #WHO #AFSP #INFOTES #LifelineInternational #Google #Facebook #WorldMentalHealthAndWellnessAwarenessWeek #WorldMentalHealthAndWellnessAwarenessMonth #aasradotinfo. Even when our lives appear fine from the outside, locked within can be a world of quiet suffering, leading some to the decision to end their life. At TEDYou, JD Schramm asks us to break the silence surrounding suicide and suicide attempts, and to create much-needed resources to help people who reclaim their life after escaping death. Resources: http://t.co/wsNrY9C https://www.ted.com/talks/jd_schramm